Ideographies
  • 7:4: “The Diam... 7:4: “The Diamond Throne”, by Marsheila Rockwell We met before the Diamond Throne Privileged children of the Gem Court Fosterlings pledging our...
  • 9:3: “diurnal/... 9:3: “diurnal/nocturnal”, by David Kopaska-Merkel long days fade to evening’s mare: dust yawns through scissored gapes ambiguous worlds in...
  • Editor’s Note:... Editor’s Note: Vol. 4, Issue 1 Our latest issue of Ideomancer explores the theme of journeys — ones we undertake willingly and those that...
  • 4:4: “The Dutc... 4:4: “The Dutchman’s Children”, by irving After class, the old pilot loosened up over a couple beers and told us the truth about the legends in the...
  • 8:4: “Rumpled ... 8:4: “Rumpled Skin”, by Mari Ness My gold made her into a queen, although she hated me for it. From the shadows, I watched as she shuddered...
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Current Issue
Vol. 13 Issue 2
Editor's Note
Fiction
"Virtual Goods" - Michael J. DeLuca
“Always Forever Now” - Drew Rhys White
Poetry
"Cardyssey" - Virginia M. Mohlere
"Inheritance, Far from the Center of the World" - Sara Saab
"The Memory-Thief" - Adrienne J. Odasso and Dominik Parisien
"Princess" - Lynette Mejía
Reviews
Will McIntosh's Defenders - Liz Bourke
Jo Walton's My Real Children - Claire Humphrey


Editor’s Note: Vol. 13, Issue 2...

It’s the cusp of summer, and for this quarter’s Ideomancer we’re pleased to bring you a matched, lingering pair of contemporary pieces.

Michael J. DeLuca’s “Virtual Goods” builds a quiet statement, among the post-industrial ruins of a Ukraine town, on goals, hope, and the ultimate value of art; beside it, Drew Rhys White’s “Always Forever Now” meditates on Christianity, polyamory, and sacrifice; the future, the present, and the past.

Our poetry this month, from Virginia M. Mohlere, Sara Saab, Adrienne J. Odasso, Dominik Parisien, and Lynette Mejía, ties them together with flourishes on memory, identity, family, and a sweet spring-summer wind. And as always, our book reviewers bring us their thoughts on two of this summer’s new releases.

We hope you enjoy this quarter’s issue, and if so, please consider dropping something into our tip jar. Ideomancer relies on reader donations to pay its contributors for their excellent fiction and poetry, and even five dollars makes a big difference.

Enjoy the issue, have a wonderful summer, and we’ll see you when the autumn comes in.

Leah Bobet
Publisher

Contents
Vol. 13 Issue 2
Editor’s Note
Fiction
“Virtual Goods”Michael J. DeLuca
“Always Forever Now”Drew Rhys White
Poetry
“Cardyssey”Virginia M. Mohlere
“Inheritance, Far from the Center of the World”Sara Saab
“The Memory-Thief”Adrienne J. Odasso and Dominik Parisien
“Princess”Lynette Mejía
Reviews
Will McIntosh’s DefendersLiz Bourke
Jo Walton’s My Real ChildrenClaire Humphrey

Editor’s Note: Vol. 13, Issue 1...

Happy spring, and welcome to our first Ideomancer of 2014!

We open this quarter’s trio of stories on thresholds and the new with Maya Surya Pillay’s debut publication. “ALPINES” is a gorgeously melancholy, intimate tour through one girl’s personal future Johannesburg and the ruins of a friendship. In “The Colorless Thief”, Japanese author Yukimi Ogawa tells a lyrical and biting postcolonial tale about exploitation and the nature of beauty. And finally, Tochi Onyebuchi’s “Zen and the Art of an Android Beatdown, Or Cecile Meets a Boxer: A Love Story” twines together two androids, the sweet science, and what we do to become whole.

Our poetry this month, from Shannon Quinn, Sara Cleto, Michael Matheson, and Sonya Taaffe, touch on that divide — and the tie — between the beautiful and the inevitable. And as always, our book reviewers bring us their thoughts on two of this spring’s new releases.

We hope you enjoy this quarter’s issue, and if so, please consider dropping something into our tip jar. Ideomancer relies on reader donations to pay its contributors for their excellent fiction and poetry, and even five dollars makes a big difference.

Enjoy the issue, have a wonderful spring, and we’ll see you in the summertime.

Leah Bobet
Publisher

Contents
Vol. 13 Issue 1
Editor’s Note
Fiction
“Alpines”Maya Surya Pillay
“The Colorless Thief”Yukimi Ogawa
“Zen and the Art of an Android Beatdown, Or Cecile Meets a Boxer: A Love Story”Tochi Onyebuchi
Poetry
“Clockmaker”Shannon Quinn
“The Cultivation of Beauty”Sara Cleto
“The Weight of Winter” Michael Matheson
“In Conclusion”Sonya Taaffe
Reviews
Ursula Pflug’s The Alphabet StonesMaya Chhabra
Peter Higgins’s Truth and FearLiz Bourke

Editor’s Note: Vol. 12 Issue 4...

Our final issue of the year presents a handful of ephemeral endings to round out 2013.

A. Merc Rustad’s “Thread” upends light, dark, alien intelligence, and the symbology of far-future science fiction in a story of quiet revolution. In “The Mammoth”, Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam guides us through a near-future landscape of ongoing extinctions and the nuances of a waning father-daughter relationship. And finally, Michael Matheson’s “The Last Summer” twines two hauntings together to grasp at a golden childhood moment about to fade away.

Our poetry this month, from Kelly Rose Pflug-Back, Natalia Theodoridou, Sara Cleto and Brittany Warman, and Ada Hoffmann, circles around those tenuous spaces where some things die and others change. And as always, our book reviewers bring us their thoughts on two of this winter’s new releases.

We hope you enjoy this quarter’s issue, and if so, please consider dropping something into our tip jar. Ideomancer relies on reader donations to pay its contributors for their excellent fiction and poetry, and even five dollars makes a big difference.

Enjoy the issue and your wintertime, and we’ll see you in 2014.

Leah Bobet
Publisher

Contents
Vol. 12 Issue 4
Editor’s Note
Fiction
“Thread”A. Merc Rustad
“The Mammoth”Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam
“The Last Summer”Michael Matheson
Poetry
“River”Kelly Rose Pfug-Back
“Blackmare”Natalia Theodoridou
“Skin”Sara Cleto and Brittany Warman
“The Changeling’s Escape”Ada Hoffmann
Reviews
Nalo Hopkinson’s Sister MineClaire Humphrey
Mary Anne Mohanraj’s The Stars ChangeClaire Humphrey

Editor’s Note: Vol. 12, Issue 3...

Our fall issue centres around a subject we’ve not often discussed before in these pages: family and parenting.

Adam Smith’s “A Painted Room” quietly tackles the fears and joys and resentments of parenting—and how those changes in turn change you. Sarah Byrne’s “Loved and Lost” struggles with the question of whether there is a world too bad to bring a child into, and the tenuous balance between pain and hope. And finally, Danielle Coombs debuts in our pages with “Melusine”, a breathtaking reply to everything we assume about the selkie story.

Our poetry this month, from Brittany Warman, Sarah Terry, Quinn White, and Dominik Parisien, pries into the relationships we have with our parents and our children: be they here, or far gone, or ghostly. And as always, our book reviewers bring us their thoughts on two of this fall’s new releases.

We hope you enjoy this quarter’s issue, and if so, please consider dropping something into our tip jar. Ideomancer relies on reader donations to pay its contributors for their excellent fiction and poetry, and even five dollars makes a big difference.

Enjoy the issue, and have an excellent autumn.

Leah Bobet
Publisher

Contents
Vol. 12 Issue 3
Editor’s Note
Fiction
“A Painted Room”Adam Smith
“Loved and Lost”Sarah Byrne
“Melusine”Danielle Coombs
Poetry
“Speech of the Witch of the End”Brittany Warman
“Tuesday Tuesday, Born on Wednesday, Was Born to Travel Time”Sarah Terry
“Cosmology”Quinn White
“When He Fell”Dominik Parisien
Reviews
Beth Bernobich’s AllegianceLiz Bourke
Jaime Lee Moyer’s Delia’s ShadowLiz Bourke

Editor’s Note: Vol. 12, Issue 2...

For our summer issue this year? A lighter note. (Shocked? So are we!)

We’re kicking off with return contributor A.C. Wise’s “Operation: Annihilate Mars! Or, Doctor Blood and the Ultra Fabulous Glitter Squadron” – because there is no saying no to spacefaring, crime-fighting drag queens. Try it. We’ll wait.

Our second piece for this month, Vicki Saunders’s “Deus Ex Chelonia,” takes us on the most whimsical post-apocalyptic quest we’ve read in years and years.

We’re only running two fiction pieces this issue to make room for an interview with this quarter’s featured author: Ideomancer alumnus Sofia Samatar speaks with us about language, craft, and her first novel, A Stranger in Olondria. Her “Undoomed” is also featured in our poetry section this month, alongside work from Alicia Cole and Rob Bliss, and reviews of this quarter’s new releases.

We hope you enjoy this quarter’s issue, and if so, please consider dropping something into our tip jar. Ideomancer relies on reader donations to pay its contributors for their excellent fiction and poetry, and even five dollars makes a big difference.

Enjoy the issue, and have a bright and happy summer!

Leah Bobet
Publisher

Contents
Vol. 12 Issue 2
Editor’s Note
Fiction
“Doctor Blood and the Ultra Fabulous Glitter Squadron”A. C. Wise
“Deux ex Chelonia”Vicki Saunders
Poetry
“Undoomed”Sofia Samatar
“Artemis Speaks to Aphrodite”Alicia Cole
“Solaris”Rob Bliss
Interview
“Sofia Samatar, author of A Stranger in Olondria”
Reviews
Karen Lord’s The Best of All Possible WorldsLiz Bourke
Where Thy Dark Eye Glances: Queering Edgar Allan PoeClaire Humphrey

Editor’s Note: Vol. 12, Issue 1...

And we’re back, with our first issue of 2013, a double handful of emotional stories and poems for the dark beginnings of spring. Our March issues always fall, without plans for it, into a travelling theme; here are some tales for the road.

Gabriel Murray’s “Swan-Brother” takes us into an alternate historical world for a story that’s infinitely close to home; Leah Thomas’s “Rubbernecking” gauges the distance between us and the house next door, and how near or far it can really be; and Sunny Moraine’s “The Horse Latitudes” combs two blood-soaked pasts and turns its bearings toward a new way.

Poetry from Megan Arkenberg, David C. Kopaska-Merkel, Alexandra Seidel, and Michele Bannister travels through crossroads and orbits alike, into the space between where we are and what we desire – and as always, our book reviewers bring you their thoughts on the latest releases.

We hope you enjoy this quarter’s issue, and if so, please consider dropping something into our tip jar. Ideomancer relies on reader donations to pay its contributors for their excellent fiction and poetry, and even five dollars makes a big difference.

Enjoy the issue, Happy New Year, and we’ll see you in the springtime!

Leah Bobet
Publisher

Contents
Vol. 12 Issue 1
Editor’s Note
Fiction
“Swan-Brother”Gabriel Murray
“Rubbernecking”Leah Thomas
“The Horse Latitudes”Sunny Moraine
Poetry
“Songs at a Crossroads”Megan Arkenberg
“The High Tree on the Hill”David C. Kopaska-Merkel
“Uncertainty Principle”Alexandra Seidel
“Orpheus in Orbit”Michele Bannister
Reviews
M.C. Planck’s The Kassa GambitLiz Bourke
Felix Gilman’s The Rise of Ransom CityLiz Bourke
Melanie Rawn’s TouchstoneLiz Bourke

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