Ideographies
  • Review: Stephen Grah... Review: Stephen Graham King’s Chasing Cold, reviewed by Claire Humphrey Stephen Graham King, Chasing Cold, ISBN: 9780983953173, Hadley Rille, April 2012. Reviewed by Claire...
  • 13:2: “Princes... 13:2: “Princess”, by Lynette Mejía This is my love letter to the world to spring to wildflowers growing in cold mud. This is my contribution...
  • Editor’s Note:... Editor’s Note: Vol. 12, Issue 1 And we’re back, with our first issue of 2013, a double handful of emotional stories and poems for the dark...
  • 2:4: “Natural ... 2:4: “Natural Limitations”, by Marissa K. Lingen 4 April 1876 Dear Mr. Putnam and Miss Catherine: I hope this letter finds all things well with your esteemed...
  • 9:4: “No Child... 9:4: “No Child of Daedalus”, by WC Roberts   “shoot it down in a tangle of broken planks   and brackets, twisted with string...
Recent Comments
  • Mickie Says : Quiet inspiring....
  • alexander leger-small Says : wow. this story was surprising, touching and provoking....
  • Malia Says : A fresh and intriguing story. I like the descriptions o...
  • Malia Says : A piercing and evocative poem with an interesting persp...
  • Skip Says : A parliament of owls! a sedge of cranes? I'll leave the...
  • Michael Fleming Says : "He lets the lid fall, lifts it again, and then again, ...
  • Lesley Says : Love it. Well done...
  • Diane Turnshek Says : My favorite line: "But sometime after midnight the...
  • Lynn Says : I felt the emotions. A beautiful story, thank you....
  • Fantasia Says : Quite interesting that by shortening the novel, it beca...
  • Lon Smith Roofing Reviews Fort Worth Says : 12:3: “A Painted Room”, by Adam Smith | Ideomancer Spec...
  • Joseph Marble Says : Pretty darn good. I really liked the dream like feel t...
  • CG Olsen Says : I really enjoyed this--very original and pertinent....
  • Tantra Bensko Says : Brilliant, and deeply moving, feels so real. Great plot...
  • Keri Bas Says : Hi there! Just noted that there's a typo in my last na...

Current Issue
Vol. 14 Issue 1
Editor's Note
Fiction
"ζῆ καὶ βασιλεύει" - Sonya Taaffe
“Andromache and the Dragon” - Brittany Pladek
“The Changeling and the Sun” - Lee S. Hawke
Poetry
"Twinned at Pasture" - Alicia Cole
"Cyber Saloon" - Steve Klepetar
"under a flowering cherry tree" - Yunsheng Jiang
"For a Lighter Spring Carryon" - SArah Ann Winn
Reviews
Mark Turner's When the Heavens Fall - Liz Bourke


Editor’s Note: Vol. 14 Issue 1...

After a long winter — and our special poetry issue — our first issue of 2015 brings you a handful of fresh folktales and fairytales.

Sonya Taaffe’s “ζῆ καὶ βασιλεύει” breathes blood and nuance into a dense, unique alternate history of Alexander the Great’s family; Brittany Pladek’s debut publication, “Andromache and the Dragon,” weaves a folktale that meditates on need, desire, and despair; and Lee S. Hawke’s “The Changeling and the Sun” finishes this quarter’s fiction with a modern-day mythic fantasy as kind as it is gorgeously written.

Our poetry this month, from Alicia Cole, Steve Klepetar, Yunsheng Jiang, and Sarah Ann Winn, takes the mythic and the twice-told and makes it feel new. And as always, our book reviewers bring us their thoughts on this spring’s new releases.

We hope you enjoy this quarter’s issue, and if so, please consider dropping something into our tip jar. Ideomancer relies on reader donations to pay its contributors for their excellent fiction and poetry, and even five dollars makes a big difference.

Enjoy the issue and your spring, and we’ll see you in June!

Leah Bobet
Publisher

Contents
Vol. 13 Issue 3
Editor’s Note
Fiction
“ζῆ καὶ βασιλεύει”Sonya Taaffe
“Andromache and the Dragon”Brittany Pladek
“The Changeling and the Sun”Lee S. Hawke
Poetry
“Twinned at Pasture”Alicia Cole
“Cyber Saloon”Steve Klepetar
“under a flowering cherry tree”Yunsheng Jiang
“For a Lighter Spring Carryon”SArah Ann Winn
Reviews
Mark Turner’s When the Heavens FallLiz Bourke

Editor’s Note: Vol. 13 Issue 4...

Our end-of-year issue features poems that span the night sky and look back across the centuries.

Alexandra Seidel’s “The Star Reader’s Almanac” summons the wonder of the sky, a topic taken up again in the charming scene in C.E. Hyun’s “Dragon Girl”. In Bogi Takács’s and Marian Rosarum’s poems, two very different characters – one a woman who believes herself to be unremarkable, and another a powerful goddess – travel through history on their respective quests. Next, in Mary Soon Lee’s “The Matter of the Horses” we meet King Xau once again. Having won over the horses and the horse lords, his next challenge is to capture the respect of his own general. Lynette Mejía’s “Visiting Hours” presents us with an immortal (this seems to be a running theme), but one whose vast life seems hopelessly limited by the mortality of the person she loves most. With “A Kindness of Ravens,” James J. Stevenson brings us a similar hospital scene, but one in which the confines of a hospital bed are not limiting at all – thanks to a certain trickster bird.

If you enjoy this journey through time and space, please consider leaving a small donation in our tip jar. Ideomancer relies on reader donations to pay its contributors for their excellent fiction and poetry, and even five dollars makes a big difference.

Beth Langford
Poetry Editor

Contents
Vol. 13 Issue 4
Special Poetry Issue
Editor’s Note
Poetry
“The Star Reader’s AlmanacAlexandra Seidel
“Six Hundred and Thirteen Commandments”Bogi Takács
“Demeter Sails the Stars”Marian Rosarum
“Dragon Girl”C. E. Hyun
“The Matter of the Horses”Mary Soon Lee
“Visiting Hours”Lynette Mejía
“A Kindness of Ravens”James J. Stevenson
Reviews
Helen Marshall’s Gifts for the One Who Comes AfterClaire Humphrey
Collections: Kaleidoscope and IrregularityLiz Bourke

Photograph of December frost in Sweden, by Sigurdas, is provided under Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.0 Unported license.

Editor’s Note: Vol. 13 Issue 3...

Fall is coming in, and for our September issue we’d like to bring you three meditations on disposability and indispensability; what and who is called waste, and how that matters.

Arkady Martine’s “Nothing Must Be Wasted” weaves a sharp statement on the responsibilities and costs of power on a crippled Mongol generation ship; N.M. Whitley’s “Chatarra” shows one crucial day and night in the lives of two Barcelona scrap collectors; and Chinelo Onwualu’s “Tasting Gomoa” finishes this quarter’s fiction with a gut-wrenching tale of two wives, one house, and the subtleties of objectification.

Our poetry this month, from Claudia Serea, Mary Soon Lee, Alexandra Seidel, and Alexandra de Romen, continue the discussion of war, considerations, and how what we choose to throw away truly matters. And as always, our book reviewers bring us their thoughts on two of this fall’s new releases.

We hope you enjoy this quarter’s issue, and if so, please consider dropping something into our tip jar. Ideomancer relies on reader donations to pay its contributors for their excellent fiction and poetry, and even five dollars makes a big difference.

Enjoy the issue and your autumn, and we’ll see you at the end of the year.

Leah Bobet
Publisher

Contents
Vol. 13 Issue 3
Editor’s Note
Fiction
“Nothing Must Be Wasted”Arkady Martine
“Chatarra”N. M. Whitley
“Tasting Gomoa”Chinelo Onwualu
Poetry
Three Prose PoemsClaudia Serea
“The Horse Lord”Mary Soon Lee
“The Glass Men”Alexandra Seidel
“Unknown Soldier”Alexandra de Romen
Reviews
Gemma Files’s We Will All Go Down TogetherClaire Humphrey
Antoine Rouaud’s The Path of AngerLiz Bourke

Editor’s Note: Vol. 13, Issue 2...

It’s the cusp of summer, and for this quarter’s Ideomancer we’re pleased to bring you a matched, lingering pair of contemporary pieces.

Michael J. DeLuca’s “Virtual Goods” builds a quiet statement, among the post-industrial ruins of a Ukraine town, on goals, hope, and the ultimate value of art; beside it, Drew Rhys White’s “Always Forever Now” meditates on Christianity, polyamory, and sacrifice; the future, the present, and the past.

Our poetry this month, from Virginia M. Mohlere, Sara Saab, Adrienne J. Odasso, Dominik Parisien, and Lynette Mejía, ties them together with flourishes on memory, identity, family, and a sweet spring-summer wind. And as always, our book reviewers bring us their thoughts on two of this summer’s new releases.

We hope you enjoy this quarter’s issue, and if so, please consider dropping something into our tip jar. Ideomancer relies on reader donations to pay its contributors for their excellent fiction and poetry, and even five dollars makes a big difference.

Enjoy the issue, have a wonderful summer, and we’ll see you when the autumn comes in.

Leah Bobet
Publisher

Contents
Vol. 13 Issue 2
Editor’s Note
Fiction
“Virtual Goods”Michael J. DeLuca
“Always Forever Now”Drew Rhys White
Poetry
“Cardyssey”Virginia M. Mohlere
“Inheritance, Far from the Center of the World”Sara Saab
“The Memory-Thief”Adrienne J. Odasso and Dominik Parisien
“Princess”Lynette Mejía
Reviews
Will McIntosh’s DefendersLiz Bourke
Jo Walton’s My Real ChildrenClaire Humphrey

Editor’s Note: Vol. 13, Issue 1...

Happy spring, and welcome to our first Ideomancer of 2014!

We open this quarter’s trio of stories on thresholds and the new with Maya Surya Pillay’s debut publication. “ALPINES” is a gorgeously melancholy, intimate tour through one girl’s personal future Johannesburg and the ruins of a friendship. In “The Colorless Thief”, Japanese author Yukimi Ogawa tells a lyrical and biting postcolonial tale about exploitation and the nature of beauty. And finally, Tochi Onyebuchi’s “Zen and the Art of an Android Beatdown, Or Cecile Meets a Boxer: A Love Story” twines together two androids, the sweet science, and what we do to become whole.

Our poetry this month, from Shannon Quinn, Sara Cleto, Michael Matheson, and Sonya Taaffe, touch on that divide — and the tie — between the beautiful and the inevitable. And as always, our book reviewers bring us their thoughts on two of this spring’s new releases.

We hope you enjoy this quarter’s issue, and if so, please consider dropping something into our tip jar. Ideomancer relies on reader donations to pay its contributors for their excellent fiction and poetry, and even five dollars makes a big difference.

Enjoy the issue, have a wonderful spring, and we’ll see you in the summertime.

Leah Bobet
Publisher

Contents
Vol. 13 Issue 1
Editor’s Note
Fiction
“Alpines”Maya Surya Pillay
“The Colorless Thief”Yukimi Ogawa
“Zen and the Art of an Android Beatdown, Or Cecile Meets a Boxer: A Love Story”Tochi Onyebuchi
Poetry
“Clockmaker”Shannon Quinn
“The Cultivation of Beauty”Sara Cleto
“The Weight of Winter” Michael Matheson
“In Conclusion”Sonya Taaffe
Reviews
Ursula Pflug’s The Alphabet StonesMaya Chhabra
Peter Higgins’s Truth and FearLiz Bourke

Editor’s Note: Vol. 12 Issue 4...

Our final issue of the year presents a handful of ephemeral endings to round out 2013.

A. Merc Rustad’s “Thread” upends light, dark, alien intelligence, and the symbology of far-future science fiction in a story of quiet revolution. In “The Mammoth”, Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam guides us through a near-future landscape of ongoing extinctions and the nuances of a waning father-daughter relationship. And finally, Michael Matheson’s “The Last Summer” twines two hauntings together to grasp at a golden childhood moment about to fade away.

Our poetry this month, from Kelly Rose Pflug-Back, Natalia Theodoridou, Sara Cleto and Brittany Warman, and Ada Hoffmann, circles around those tenuous spaces where some things die and others change. And as always, our book reviewers bring us their thoughts on two of this winter’s new releases.

We hope you enjoy this quarter’s issue, and if so, please consider dropping something into our tip jar. Ideomancer relies on reader donations to pay its contributors for their excellent fiction and poetry, and even five dollars makes a big difference.

Enjoy the issue and your wintertime, and we’ll see you in 2014.

Leah Bobet
Publisher

Contents
Vol. 12 Issue 4
Editor’s Note
Fiction
“Thread”A. Merc Rustad
“The Mammoth”Bonnie Jo Stufflebeam
“The Last Summer”Michael Matheson
Poetry
“River”Kelly Rose Pfug-Back
“Blackmare”Natalia Theodoridou
“Skin”Sara Cleto and Brittany Warman
“The Changeling’s Escape”Ada Hoffmann
Reviews
Nalo Hopkinson’s Sister MineClaire Humphrey
Mary Anne Mohanraj’s The Stars ChangeClaire Humphrey

Page 1 of 1112345...10...Last »