11:2: “M1″, by Eric Zboya

11:2: “M1″, by Eric Zboya


Eric Zboya is an experimental poet and visual artist who lives and works in Calgary, Canada. His work primarily focuses on how graphic imaging software visually translates and transforms text through algorithms. Currently, Zboya is investigating possible conceptual intersections between the molecular structures of compounds and textile systems of communication, such as braille, and how these intersections interact with one another within an ocular medium. Zboya’s works have appeared in literary journals and magazines throughout North America and Europe, such as Canadian Literature Quarterly, Western Humanities Review, filling Station, Kakofanie. His works have been exhibited internationally at the Bury Text Festival, the Convergence Literary Art Exhibit in Belfast, the Whitechapel Gallery in London, and forthcoming at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Denver.  He says:

 M1 attempts to photo-realistically depict the Crab Nebula using nothing but letters. This depiction helps to showcase the premise that all matter in the universe is made up of language. Everything, from quantum singularities to galactic superclusters, is, on the basest of levels, made up of units of information, units of language, that, through some mysterious dialogic compulsion, cluster together to form interstellar bodies of texts – bodies of poetry. There is the saying, coined by the late Carl Sagan, that we are all made of star stuff. Almost every element on earth, from the calcium found in our bones to the iron found in our blood, represents a form of paragrammatic language created intertextually through the dispersal and incorporation of stellar material ejected from the explosions of massive stars now extinct. We are made of star stuff; the mind that creates our thought patterns is made of star stuff; the vocal system that helps to convey acoustically our thoughts is made of star stuff. The language we create, and the language that we consume, not only finds its origins within the fabrics of space, and far back into the origins of time itself, but demonstrates William S. Burroughs’ idea that language is a virus from outer space.
 



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