9:3: “Moondance”, by Mikal Trimm

9:3: “Moondance”, by Mikal Trimm
Moon near-full, they dance beneath the gibbous light.
Babes enshrouded, mothers run amock,
Fathers ensconced in firelight sunheat,
My sisters straining at their diaphanous virginities,
And I, I, I
Beat the drum, thrum-thrum, thrum-thrum.
Humpback moon, no power there,
But still the parents dance and scream
While children dodge beneath their feet.
Some miss the beat, are trampled underneath.
And I, I, I
Beat the drum, thrum-thrum, thrum-thrum.
A lustful thrust, not yet, not yet,
And sisters-mothers-fathers-grands
Run rampant through the standing stones.
The children hide in shadows, crouch in fox-dens.
And I, I, I
Beat the drum, thrum-thrum, thrum-thrum.
Two nights before the Solstice,
Two nights before the sacred Moon is full.
Power upon power, magic upon magic.
Nights of blood and hope and abandon.
And I, I, I
Beat the drum, thrum-thrum, thrum-thrum.
Mother writhes naked in the bitter light.
My sisters woo me, come away, away from the drum, child,
We know a deeper, stronger beat.
Father unveils infants and measures sacrifices.
And I
I
I
Beat the drum.
Thrum-thrum.
Thrum-thrum.


Mikal Trimm writes short stories and poetry. Lots of them end up in places where they’re read by others. What more could he want? He says:

There’s a Van Morrison song called “Moondance”, where he says what a great night for love it is, under that nice shiny moon and all. Other things happen under the pale moonlight, though. Bad things. Not sure if Van would deign to sing about them, but I’m more than happy to do the job — I don’t have to hit the high notes when I’m writing…



2 Responses to “9:3: “Moondance”, by Mikal Trimm”

  1. The music of this poem is palpable; the poet translates music to writing in a way that the reader can feel. Desire courses through the poem in a strangely compelling and incestuous way. “Diaphanous” is a brilliant word choice.

  2. […] the fiction, this issue of Ideomancer includes poems by Rachel Swirsky, David Kopaska-Merkel, Mikal Trimm, and Ann K. Schwader. There are also reviews of Nnedi Okorafor’s novel Who Fears Death (reviewed […]

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