Ideographies
  • 10:1: “Soul St... 10:1: “Soul Streets”, by Mari Ness Oh, these streets aren’t for fairy tales, for tiny glass slippers and sweet kissing roses, for...
  • Editor’s Note:... Editor’s Note: Vol. 2, Issue 10 Bruce Holland Rogers joins us in October as Featured Author. Dick Trezza and Jamie Rosen take a slightly...
  • 14:1: “Twinned... 14:1: “Twinned at Pasture”, by Alicia Cole “The Reverend John Michell calculated in 1767 that the probability of a chance alignment of so many...
  • 12:4: “The Cha... 12:4: “The Changeling’s Escape”, by Ada Hoffmann   A child, night-creeping   far from the whitewashed porch.   A winding...
  • 7:4: “What You... 7:4: “What You Never Knew About the Princess”, by J.C. Runolfson What you never knew about the princess is that she likes to go down to the shore at midnight kick off her...
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Current Issue
Vol. 14 Issue 1
Editor's Note
Fiction
"ζῆ καὶ βασιλεύει" - Sonya Taaffe
“Andromache and the Dragon” - Brittany Pladek
“The Changeling and the Sun” - Lee S. Hawke
Poetry
"Twinned at Pasture" - Alicia Cole
"Cyber Saloon" - Steve Klepetar
"under a flowering cherry tree" - Yunsheng Jiang
"For a Lighter Spring Carryon" - SArah Ann Winn
Reviews
Mark Turner's When the Heavens Fall - Liz Bourke


Editor’s Note: Vol. 2, Issue 6...

This month we conlude our look at Jay Lake with the sequel to last month’s “The Courtesy of Guests,” and a philosophical interview with Mikal Trimm. Spencer Allen revisists his days as “The Shift Manager” while Dorothee Danzmann tells of “Haunting Hattie.” Finally we bring you a classic fable from Oscar Wilde. “The Nightingale and the Rose” brought a tear to even my jaundiced eye.
Lee Battersby scrubs up, puts on the white gloves, and delves into William Gibson’s Pattern Recognition.
Hope you enjoy this month’s issue.

Chris Clarke
Publisher

Editor’s Note: Vol. 2, Issue 5...

This month Jay Lake continues his reign as Featured Author with the award winning, far future, “The Courtesy of Guests.” Kyri Freeman revisits her familiar American Civil War battlefield in the haunting tale of “The Path,” while j.d. paradise tells a bittersweet story in “The Girl with the Butterfly Tongue.” Jack London provides our classic for May with “A Thousand Deaths.
Lee Battersby, our erstwhile reviewer, fresh from winning the Ditmar award for Best New Talent at this year’s Australian SF National Convention, looks at the small press offerings on show there.
Hope you enjoy this month’s issue.

Chris Clarke
Publisher

Editor’s Note: Vol. 2, Issue 4...

April welcomes Jay Lake as our Featured Author with the rather unseasonal “In Defeat of Transcendent Epiphany.” Elizabeth Bear takes us to the dead of winter in “Ice” while Marissa K. Lingen looks at a few dusty old beliefs in “Natural Limitations.” Our classic is from the author of the much loved classic The Wind in the Willows, Kenneth Grahame.
As gleefully promised last month, Lee Battersby looks at the tri-continent anthology, Gathering the Bones.
Hope you enjoy this month’s issue.

Chris Clarke
Publisher

Editor’s Note: Vol. 2, Issue 3...

This month we conlude our look at Robert Hood with “Necropolis” and an interview by Deborah Biancotti. British-born Prague resident, Cyril Simsa, ponders Mélisende while Hannah Wolf Bowen writes a tale of horses with horns. Finally, and not before time, we bring you our first classic from a woman writer, “Death And The Woman” by Gertrude Atherton.
I hope you enjoy this month’s issue.

Chris Clarke
Publisher

Editor’s Note: Vol. 2, Issue 2...

February sees Robert Hood meditate on one of my favourite words – entrophy. Kenneth Brady brings us a timely tale in “So It Ends” while A. Leigh Jones looks at a change of seasons. Our classic this month is something a little different from the master, Edgar Allan Poe.
Ideomancer Unbound has been reviewed by Amy Sterling Casil at SFReader.com. You can read her thoughts here and buy the anthology here.
We are now reopen to submissions with new guidelines. Please read them carefully before submitting. You will note we are now paying US3c a word up to a maximum of US$100 for fiction.
Hope you enjoy this month’s issue.

Chris Clarke
Publisher

Editor’s Note: Vol. 2, Issue 1...

We start the New Year with Featured Author Robert Hood and “Nobody’s Car.” Watch for more of Robert’s fiction in the coming months. Daniel Goss gives us a look at CurvyNews.com and Bill Gauthier tells us what kids get up to on “Snow Day.” Our classic this month is from Scottish author George MacDonald.
We are closed to submissions at present and will reopen on February 1st with revised guidelines.
And if you don’t already have a copy of the fabulous Ideomancer Unbound anthology, please give it serious consideration.
Hope you enjoy this month’s issue.

Chris Clarke
Publisher

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