Ideographies
  • 12:1: “Orpheus... 12:1: “Orpheus in Orbit”, by Michele Bannister These are the scarred faces of lonely moons. Ice-hulled and ocean-sheltering, aqua-veined by deep-delved...
  • 5:3: “Letter F... 5:3: “Letter From a Teddy Bear on Veteran’s Day”, by Sarah Monette 1. It is early morning, barely dawn. It rained all night, and it will be raining again soon. The air tastes...
  • Review: Kaleidoscope... Review: Kaleidoscope and Irregularity, reviewed by Liz Bourke Kaleidoscope, edited by Alisa Krasnostein and Julia Rios, ISBN 9781922101112. Twelfth Planet Press,...
  • 13:1: “The Wei... 13:1: “The Weight of Winter”, by Michael Matheson There is a wound here, set deep. A tether strung between two bodies. Held taut by faces beneath frozen...
  • 8:4: “Oak Park... 8:4: “Oak Park Eris”, by C. S. E. Cooney (For Mrs. Q) “You look just a little bit ugly,” her daughter ventured. “Miss, I’ve...
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Current Issue
Vol. 14 Issue 1
Editor's Note
Fiction
"ζῆ καὶ βασιλεύει" - Sonya Taaffe
“Andromache and the Dragon” - Brittany Pladek
“The Changeling and the Sun” - Lee S. Hawke
Poetry
"Twinned at Pasture" - Alicia Cole
"Cyber Saloon" - Steve Klepetar
"under a flowering cherry tree" - Yunsheng Jiang
"For a Lighter Spring Carryon" - SArah Ann Winn
Reviews
Mark Turner's When the Heavens Fall - Liz Bourke


Editor’s Note: Vol. 1, Issue 12...

Ideomancer magazine is pleased to announce the release of the Unbound anthology. This ebook, published by Fictionwise, consists of the following 26 speculative short stories.

“Maybe Ideomancer Unbound is like a great big quilt, with a different, complex picture on each square. The editors should be praised for assembling such an impressive collection of work, and readers will get their money’s worth in plenty of surprise and delight.”
— Amy Sterling Casil,  SFReader.com

Hope you enjoy this month’s issue.

Amber van Dyk
Managing Editor

Editor’s Note: Vol. 1, Issue 11...

October turned out to be a big month for Ideomancer — we received favourable reviews from Tangent and SF Reader, started a feedback newsgroup at SFF.Net, and moved oh so close to releasing Ideomancer Unbound. Look for the anthology in December.
In November, James Allison teaches us “The Making of the Numbers,” Stephen Dedman walks us through the “Valley of the Shadows,” and Sarah Prineas invites you to wonder at “The Dragons of Fair D’Ellene.” In our classic story, Frank Stockton poses us the most difficult of questions.
Lee reviews Vinland the Dream and Other Stories.
Hope you enjoy this month’s issue.

Chris Clarke
Publisher

Editor’s Note: Vol. 1, Issue 10...

After the trials of publishing the September issue, October has been a breeze. James Allison takes on the mantle of Featured Author with “The Four Bridges of Kandos.” More of his fiction in the coming months. Leah Bobet adds a new twist to an old game in “Playing The Dozens,” while Marsha Sisolak does the same with a favourite fairytale. And finally, after a number of requests, a classic tale from Lord Dunsany.
Andy Miller once again takes to the interview trail for us with a look at an Australian adaption of Greg Bear’s “Petra.” Our regular reviewer Lee Battersby has a peek at man of the moment, China Miéville, and his latest book, The Scar.
Hope you enjoy October’s Ideomancer.

Chris Clarke
Publisher

Editor’s Note: Vol. 1, Issue 9...

Apologies for the lateness of this month’s issue. It is testament to the power of the internet that it reaches you at all, in that it is being published not from my usual desktop PC in Australia, but a laptop in a cockroach infested, mosquito ridden hotel in South America (oh the joys of cold-water shaving).
All that aside, we have more great fiction. Emily Gaskin looks at love and all its dark recesses. Christopher Rowe completes his tenant as Featured Author with the incendiary “VFD Adventures” and an illuminating interview. We have more heated exchanges in Daniel J. Bishop’s “Noldus and Vespa,” while the sting in this months tales comes from Algernon Blackwood’s “An Egyptian Hornet.”
If you can get past my fever induced introduction, you’ll enjoy this month’s issue.

Chris Clarke
Publisher

Editor’s Note: Vol. 1, Issue 8...

August’s speculative journey sees Samuel Minier explore between this world and the next in “Nothing But Worm Meat.” Christopher Rowe takes us to a land where some are “Kin to Crows,” while Kyri Freeman visits upon “The Merrow.” The master pilot of unfathomable horrors, Howard Phillips Lovecraft, guides us to Ulthar and its feline denizens.
In the run up to ConJose and the 2002 Hugo awards we look at some of the nominees. Charles Coleman Finlay gives us an indepth look at Jack Dann’s “The Diamond Pit” and Lee Battersby reviews the short story shortlist.
Oh, and we made the Locus list of the 20 Best Websites. Go us :-).

Hope you enjoy this months issue.

Chris Clarke
Publisher

Editor’s Note: Vol. 1, Issue 7...

Welcome to the July issue of Ideomancer Speculative Fiction. Christopher Rowe will be gracing our digital pages for the next three issues as Featured Author. His first offering is a story of family and photographers, of “Horsethieves and Preachermen.”

K. Bird Lincoln takes us off-world to the explore the mystery of “Usher’s Well,” while Daniel Eness, to use his words, brings us a ‘peppy little tale of terror.’
To end our fiction for the month, Rudyard Kipling tells us a story Just So.
This month we pipe aboard Lee Battersby, who over the coming months will be bring us regular book reviews. Watch for a review of China Mieville’s latest, The Scar, shortly.

Cheers
Chris Clarke
Publisher

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