6:2: “Five Wisdoms of the Snow Queen”, by Marcie Lynn Tentchoff...

Never, when you meet a soul mate
tell him so,

Or wear your heart upon
your sleeve,

Or offer it, well mixed with wine,
warm in a cup.

And never smile, and laugh, and
and walk away,

Pretending hearts are sturdy things,
or that you’ve spares,

Unless you’ve built up barriers
of driven snow,

And ice-encrusted adamant
to ward you well.

And never, ever, if you’re wise,
let those walls fall.


Marcie Lynn Tentchoff is an Aurora Award winning poet/writer from the west coast of Canada. Her work has appeared in such magazines as On Spec, Weird Tales, Talebones, and Illumen, as well as in various anthologies and online publications.

Images of ice and cold have always been sort of coping mechanism symbols for me, hiding places against feeling, or caring too much. “Five Wisdoms of the Snow Queen” worked its way out of those images. After all, who could be colder, safer, more numbingly protected, than the Snow Queen herself?

6:1: “Snow Melt”, by Marcie Tentchoff...

The snow-draped branches
of his shelter offer small protection
from the chilly winds that blow outside,
and yes, he shivers, cold, but warm inside,
within the confines of his ice-white skin,
where I have touched his heart with
dreams of tropic shores, all golden sand
and sapphire sea, with tourists sipping
tartly flavored citrus sherbets
out of flutes of frosted glass.

I smile at him, and tell him tales
of magic lamps, and camels bearing
wealthy kings upon their backs
through blazing heat.
I stroke his face with fingertips
almost as cold as he, and try
to keep my eyes from straying
to the rising mercury, my mind from
dwelling on the fact that there is
less of my dear love today,
than there was just a week ago.

I let him dream of Istanbul.


Marcie Lynn Tentchoff is an Aurora Award winning poet/writer from the west coast of Canada. Her work has appeared in such magazines as On Spec, Weird Tales, Talebones, and Illumen, as well as in various anthologies and online publications.

This poem was born from the odd juxtaposition of thinking about Istanbul while looking out at the largest B.C. snowfall in years.